Sofia Kovalevskaya

Sofia Kovalevskaya's father, Vasily Korvin-Krukovsky, was a general in the Russian Army and was part of Russian nobility. Her mother, Yelizaveta Shubert, was from a German family with many scholars; her maternal grandfather and great-grandfather were both mathematicians. An extraordinary woman, Sofia Kovalevskaya (also known as Sonia Kovalevsky) was not only a great mathematician, but also a writer and advocate of women's rights in the 19th century. It was her struggle to obtain the best education available which began to open doors at universities to women. Biografía de Sofia Kovalévskaya Sofia Kovalévskaya (15 de enero de 1850 – 10 de febrero de 1891) matemática, escritora y defensora de los derechos de la mujer. Nació en Moscú, Rusia. Su familia gozaba de un estatus acomodado, eran burgueses de abundantes recursos económicos y, se desarrollaron en el campo intelectual. En suma, sus padres […] Kovalevsky, Sonya (or Kovalevskaya, Sofya Vasilyevna) (b.Moscow, Russia, 15 January “1850; d.Stockholm, Sweden, 10 February 1891) mathematics.. Sonya Kovalevsky was the greatest woman mathe. matician prior to the twentieth century. She was the daughter of Vasily Korvin-Krukovsky, an artillery general, and Yelizaveta Shubert, both well-educated members of the Russian nobility. Sofia Kovalevskaya en la biografía escrita por Anne-Charlotte Leffler. Su libro autobiográfico Recuerdos de la infancia (ver [3], [13]) un relato que nos narra las vivencias y los sentimientos de su niñez, además de describir los problemas y los ideales de la sociedad rusa en la segunda mitad del siglo XIX, fue traducido al sueco y ... Sofya Vasilyevna Kovalevskaya, mathematician and writer who made a valuable contribution to the theory of partial differential equations. She was the first woman in modern Europe to gain a doctorate in mathematics, the first to join the editorial board of a scientific journal, and the first to be Biography Sofia Kovalevskaya was the middle child of Vasily Korvin-Krukovsky, an artillery general, and Yelizaveta Shubert, both well-educated members of the Russian nobility. Sofia was educated by tutors and governesses, lived first at Palabino, the Krukovsky country estate, then in St. Petersburg, and joined her family's social circle which included the author Dostoevsky. Sofia Kovalevskaya Award - The Alexander von Humboldt Foundation of Germany bestows the Sofia Kovalevskaya Award every two years. Sofia Kovalevskaya (film) - Sofya Kovalevskaya (Russian: Софья Ковалевская) is a 1985 biographical television miniseries, directed by Ayan Shakhmaliyeva and starring Elena Safonova. Sofia Kovalevskaya (née Korvin-Krukovskaya), was born in Moscow, the second of three children. Her father, Vasily Vasilyevich Korvin-Krukovsky, was a man of Polish descent and was Lieutenant-General of Artillery who served in the Imperial Russian Army. Sofia Kovalevskaya died from pneumonia in 1891, at the age of forty-one. BIBLIOGRAPHY. 1. Sofia Kovalevskaia, A Russian Childhood, trans. and ed. Beatrice Stillman (New York: Springer-Verlag, 1978) 2. Don Kennedy, Little Sparrow (Athens, Ohio: Ohio Univ. Press,1983) 3.

Ben Shapiro: RT @hollymathnerd: Great Woman of Mathematics: Sofia Kovalevskaya (1850-1891). Contributions to analysis, partial differential equations, a… (Fri Jun 21 14:20:04 +0000 2019)

2019.06.21 16:20 TweetArchiveBot Ben Shapiro: RT @hollymathnerd: Great Woman of Mathematics: Sofia Kovalevskaya (1850-1891). Contributions to analysis, partial differential equations, a… (Fri Jun 21 14:20:04 +0000 2019)

Ben Shapiro: RT @hollymathnerd: Great Woman of Mathematics: Sofia Kovalevskaya (1850-1891). Contributions to analysis, partial differential equations, a… (Fri Jun 21 14:20:04 +0000 2019) submitted by TweetArchiveBot to TweetArchiver [link] [comments]


2019.05.19 18:41 Troiswallofhair Science names for girls

I often see posts requesting a name that has some meaning or story behind it. This is a bit more challenging for girls since history tends to gloss over women's accomplishments. I did buy a neat book for my daughter though called, "Women in Science," by Rachel Ignotofsky and thought some of you might like the list of names included therin. If a name below sounds intriguing, you can google her for more information. Obviously not all of these would make an ideal girl name everywhere -- I'm looking at you, Wang and Karen Horney -- but it's a start.

Hypatia
Maria Sibylla Merian
Wang Zhenyi
Mary Anning
Ada Lovelace
Elizabeth Blackwell
Hertha Ayrton
Karen Horney
Nettie Stevens
Florence Bascom
Marie Curie
Mary Agnes Chase
Lise Meitner
Lillian Gilbreth
Emmy Noether
Edith Clarke
Marjory Stoneman Douglas
Alice Ball
Gerty Cori
Joan Beauchamp Procter
Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin
Barbara McClintock
Maria Goeppert-Mayer
Grace Hopper
Rachel Carson
Rita Levi-Montalcini
Dorothy Hodgkin
Chien-Shiung Wu
Hedy Lamarr
Mamie Phipps Clark
Gertrude Elion
Katherine Johnson
Jane Cooke Wright
Rosalind Franklin
Rosalyn Yalow
Esther Lederberg
Vera Rubin
Annie Easley
Jane Goodall
Sylvia Earle
Valentina Tereshkova
Patricia Bath
Christiane Nusslein-Volhard
Jocelyn Bell Burnell
Sau Lan Wu
Elizabeth Blackburn
Katia Krafft
Mae Jemison
May-Britt Moser
Maryam Mirzakhani
Some others: Irene Joliot-Curie, Janaki Ammal, Anna Jane Harrison, Shirley Ann Jackson, Linda Buck, Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, Maria Mitchell, Emily Roebling, Sofia Kovalevskaya, Mary Leakey, Edith Flanigen, Ada Yonath, Sally Ride and Tessy Thomas.
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2018.09.26 16:10 Udzu Nobel Prize in Physics, 19th century edition [COMPLETE]

Background
After digging out my science history books and spending too long online, I finally completed this earlier post of mine about extending the Nobel Prize in Physics to the 19th century. Thanks to KathyLovesPhysics and mnlx for some suggestions.
Here then are 100 prizes from 1801 to 1900 for contributions in the field of physics. The list follows similar rules to the real Nobel, limiting each prize to at most three living winners. I've omitted 19th century contributions that were already awarded a Nobel (such as Michelson's experiment) but included awards in areas of physics not usually recognised by the Nobel (such as mathematical physics, geophysics and astrophysics).
There is of course one massive cheat: hindsight. Though all the discoveries awarded were recognised to some extent at the time, hindsight allows me to filter out the most significant ones, and (rather cheekily) time the awards so as to minimise the number of omissions due to tragically young deaths (eg Carnot and Hertz at 36).
A few observations:
LAUREATES OF THE PRE-NOBEL PRIZE IN PHYSICS
  • 1801 Henry Cavendish, for his measurement of the gravitational constant
  • 1802 Charles-Augustin de Coulomb, for his description of the electrostatic force
  • 1803 Pierre Méchain, Jean-Baptiste Delambre & René Just Haüy, for their experimental work in defining the gramme and mètre
  • 1804 Marc-Auguste Pictet & Pierre Prévost, for their work on thermal radiation
  • 1805 Alessandro Volta, for his invention of the electrical battery
  • 1806 William Herschel & Johann Wilhelm Ritter, for their discovery of infrared and ultraviolet radiation
  • 1807 Giovanni Venturi, for his discovery of the Venturi effect
  • 1808 John Dalton & Joseph Louis Gay-Lussac, for their gas laws, including the law of thermal expansion
  • 1809 John Leslie & Count Rumford, for their work on thermal emissivity
  • 1810 Humphry Davy, for his invention of the carbon arc lamp
  • 1811 Étienne-Louis Malus & François Arago, for their discoveries of reflective and rotary polarisation
  • 1812 Pierre-Simon Laplace, for his work on celestial mechanics
  • 1813 Ernst Chladni & Jean-Baptiste Biot, for establishing that meteorites are of extraterrestrial origin
  • 1814 William Herschel, for his observations and identification of binary stars
  • 1815 René Just Haüy, for his foundational work on crystallography
  • 1816 Louis Poinsot, for his development of geometrical mechanics
  • 1817 Giuseppe Piazzi, Heinrich Wilhelm Olbers & Karl Ludwig Harding, for their discoveries of the first asteroids
  • 1818 William Wollaston & Joseph von Fraunhofer, for their work on spectroscopy and discovery of Fraunhofer lines
  • 1819 Jean-Baptiste Biot & David Brewster, for their work on light polarisation
  • 1820 Pierre Dulong & Alexis Petit, for their work on heat capacity
  • 1821 Jean-Baptiste Biot & Félix Savart, for their discovery of the Biot–Savart law
  • 1822 Hans Christian Ørsted & André-Marie Ampère, for their discovery and theory of electromagnetism
  • 1823 Thomas Johann Seebeck, for his discovery of the thermoelectric effect
  • 1824 Thomas Young & Augustin-Jean Fresnel, for demonstrating the wave theory of light
  • 1825 Jean-Louis Pons & Johann Franz Encke, for their discovery and analysis of comets, including Encke's Comet
  • 1826 Humphry Davy & Michael Faraday, for their liqufaction of gases
  • 1827 Joseph Fourier, for his work on thermal conduction and its applicability to other boundary-value problems
  • 1828 François Arago, Charles Babbage & John Herschel, for their work on rotating magnetic fields
  • 1829 William Sturgeon, for his invention of the electromagnet
  • 1830 Siméon-Denis Poisson, Augustin-Louis Cauchy & Sophie Germain, for their work on waves and elasticity
  • 1831 Nicolas Léonard Sadi Carnot, for his foundational work on thermodynamics
  • 1832 Georg Ohm, for his work on electrical resistance
  • 1831 Johann Schweigger, Leopoldo Nobili & Johann Christian Poggendorff, for their early galvanometers
  • 1834 Michael Faraday & Joseph Henry, for their independent discovery of electromagnetic induction
  • 1835 Siméon-Denis Poisson & George Green, for their mathematical theories of electricity and magnetism
  • 1836 Wilhelm Weber & Carl Gauss, for their investigations into magnetism
  • 1837 Alexander von Humboldt & Heinrich Wilhelm Dove, for their pioneering work in climatology
  • 1838 John Scott Russell, for his discovery of solitary waves
  • 1839 Michael Faraday, for his demonstration of specific inductive capacity
  • 1840 William Hamilton, for his formulation of Hamiltonian mechanics
  • 1841 John Herschel & George Biddell Airy, for their observation and explanation of the Airy disk phenomenon
  • 1842 Gaspard-Gustave de Coriolis, for his work on rotating frames of reference
  • 1843 Thomas Graham, for his study of gas diffusion and effusion
  • 1844 Jean Peltier, for his discoveries of thermoelectric cooling and electrostatic induction
  • 1845 John Frederic Daniell & William Robert Grove, for their electrochemical cells
  • 1846 Friedrich Bessel, for his measurement of stellar parallax
  • 1847 Urbain Le Verrier & Johann Galle, for their prediction and discovery of Neptune
  • 1848 Emil Lenz & Moritz von Jacobi, for their work on electromagnetic induction, including Lenz's law
  • 1849 Michael Faraday, for his discovery of the Faraday effect, demonstrating that light and electromagnetism are related
  • 1850 Jean-Daniel Colladon & Charles Sturm, for their investigation of the behaviour of sound and light in water
  • 1851 Samuel Hunter Christie & Charles Wheatstone, for their invention of the Wheatstone bridge
  • 1852 Christian Doppler & Hippolyte Fizeau, for their independent discovery of the Doppler shift
  • 1853 Julius von Mayer, James Joule & Hermann von Helmholtz, for their work on the mechanical foundation of thermodynamics and the law of conservation of energy
  • 1854 George Gabriel Stokes & Adhémar Saint-Venant, for their work on fluid dynamics and flow velocity
  • 1855 Heinrich Schwabe & Rudolf Wolf, for their research on sunspots
  • 1856 Lord Rosse, for his observation of spiral nebulae
  • 1857 Henry Darcy, for his work in hydraulics, including establishing Darcy's law
  • 1858 Jean Poiseuille & Gotthilf Hagen, for their work on laminar flow
  • 1859 Karl Ludwig Hencke & William Lassell, for their discoveries of asteroids and satellites
  • 1860 Nicholas Callan, Charles Grafton Page & Heinrich Ruhmkorff, for their development of the induction coil
  • 1861 Rudolf Clausius, Lord Kelvin & William Rankine, for their laws of thermodynamics
  • 1862 Hippolyte Fizeau & Léon Foucault, for their accurate measurements of the speed of light
  • 1863 Robert Mallet, for his foundational work on seismology
  • 1864 Michael Faraday & John Tyndall, for their work on diamagnetism
  • 1865 Karl Sondhauss & Pieter Rijke, for their investigation of thermoacoustic oscillation
  • 1866 Gaston Planté, for his invention of the rechargeable lead-acid battery
  • 1867 August Toepler & Léon Foucault, for their invention of schlieren photography
  • 1868 James Clark Maxwell, for formulating a theory of electromagnetic radiation
  • 1869 Anders Ångström, David Alter & Gustav Kirchhoff, for their foundational work in spectroscopy
  • 1870 Daniel Kirkwood, for his discovery and explanation of the Kirkwood asteroid gaps
  • 1871 Pierre Janssen & Norman Lockyer, for their discovery of helium through solar spectroscopy
  • 1872 Samuel Alfred Varley, Werner von Siemens & Charles Wheatstone, for their development of the self-exciting dynamo
  • 1873 Richard Carrington & Gustav Spörer, for their studies of the solar cycle
  • 1874 Thomas Andrews & James Thomson, for their work on phase transitions
  • 1875 Alexandre Edmond Becquerel & Willoughby Smith, for their observations of the photovoltaic effect and photoconductivity of selenium
  • 1876 Édouard Roche & George William Hill, for their work on celestial mechanics
  • 1877 James Clark Maxwell, Ludwig Boltzmann & Josiah Gibbs, for the development of statistical mechanics
  • 1878 Johann Wilhelm Hittorf & Eugen Goldstein, for their investigation of cathode rays
  • 1879 Karl Ferdinand Braun, Arthur Schuster & Edwin Hall, for their observations of rectification and the Hall effect in semiconductors
  • 1880 James Harrison, Ferdinand Carré & Carl von Linde, for their work in refrigeration
  • 1881 Lord Rayleigh, for his discoveries in acoustics and optics
  • 1882 William Crookes, for his invention of Crookes tubes and observation of plasma
  • 1883 Pierre & Jacques Curie, for their discovery of piezoelectricity
  • 1884 John Hopkinson, for his work on electric generators and electricity distribution
  • 1885 Josef Stefan & Ludwig Boltzmann, for their work on thermal radiation
  • 1886 Hermann von Helmholtz, Lord Kelvin & Osborne Reynolds, for their work on hydrodynamic stability
  • 1887 Sofia Kovalevskaya & Henri Poincaré, for their work on the shape of Saturn's rings
  • 1888 Ernst Mach & Peter Salcher, for their study of supersonic fluid mechanics
  • 1889 Johann Balmer & Johannes Rydberg, for their formulas describing spectral line wavelengths
  • 1890 Zénobe Gramme, Galileo Ferraris & Nikola Tesla, for their development of electric motors
  • 1891 William & Margaret Huggins, for their work in astronomical spectroscopy
  • 1892 Heinrich Hertz, for proving the existence of electromagnetic waves
  • 1893 Loránd Eötvös, for demonstrating beyond doubt that inertial mass and gravitational mass are equivalent
  • 1894 Heinrich Bruns & Henri Poincaré, for their work on the three-body problem and chaotic motion
  • 1895 Thomas Alva Edison & Charles Proteus Steinmetz, for their discoveries and inventions in the field of electrical engineering
  • 1896 Victor Schumann, for his discovery of vacuum ultraviolet
  • 1897 Oliver Heaviside & Hendrik Lorentz, for their contributions to the mathematical description of electromagnetic phenomena
  • 1898 John Kerr & Friedrich Pockels, for their work on birefringence
  • 1899 Ernst Abbe, Siegfried Czapski & August Köhler, for their contributions to microscopy
  • 1900 Oskar Emil Meyer, Lord Kelvin & Woldemar Voigt, for their work on viscoelasticity
submitted by Udzu to Physics [link] [comments]


2017.07.28 16:37 Lol33ta Sofia Kovalevskaya - STEM: Epic Heroes by Amanda Duarte

Sofia Kovalevskaya - STEM: Epic Heroes by Amanda Duarte submitted by Lol33ta to ImaginaryScholars [link] [comments]


2017.07.28 16:37 Lol33ta Sofia Kovalevskaya - STEM: Epic Heroes by Amanda Duarte

Sofia Kovalevskaya - STEM: Epic Heroes by Amanda Duarte submitted by Lol33ta to ImaginaryHistory [link] [comments]


2016.08.12 15:23 Sapidianus TIL that Sofia Kovalevskaya was the first woman to earn a Ph.D. in mathematics, despite the fact that Russia, her native country, and many other European universities at that time did not allow women.

TIL that Sofia Kovalevskaya was the first woman to earn a Ph.D. in mathematics, despite the fact that Russia, her native country, and many other European universities at that time did not allow women. submitted by Sapidianus to todayilearned [link] [comments]


2016.07.02 06:37 UncountableSet Quotes from mathematicians from under-represented (in U.S.) groups (e.g. women, latino)?

Title says it all. I have found a couple, i.e.
"It is impossible to be a mathematician without being a poet in soul." — Sofia Kovalevskaya
But thought people here might be able to provide a few more.
submitted by UncountableSet to math [link] [comments]


2016.04.03 14:13 noeatnosleep Sofia Kovalevskaya ~1880 (One of the first female math profs, the legend tells she was the one who broke Alfred Nobels heart)

Sofia Kovalevskaya ~1880 (One of the first female math profs, the legend tells she was the one who broke Alfred Nobels heart) submitted by noeatnosleep to ImagesOfThe1800s [link] [comments]


2016.04.03 14:12 localhorst Sofia Kovalevskaya ~1880 (One of the first female math profs, the legend tells she was the one who broke Alfred Nobels heart)

Sofia Kovalevskaya ~1880 (One of the first female math profs, the legend tells she was the one who broke Alfred Nobels heart) submitted by localhorst to OldSchoolCool [link] [comments]


2014.08.05 08:47 palour Sofia Kovalevskaya (1850- 1891): Toán Học - Niềm khao khát bất diệt

submitted by palour to KhoaHoc [link] [comments]


2014.01.15 07:55 crapfoodpants Happy Birthday Sofia Kovalevskaya - the world's first female math professor

Happy Birthday Sofia Kovalevskaya - the world's first female math professor submitted by crapfoodpants to russia [link] [comments]


'Yo quiero ser científica': Sofia Kovalévskaya - YouTube mathtery Sofia Kovalevskaya - YouTube Sofia Kovalevskaya Sofía Kovalévskaya SOFIA KOVALEVSKAYA Sofia Kovalevskaya Mini-Bio

Sonya Kovalevsky Encyclopedia.com

  1. 'Yo quiero ser científica': Sofia Kovalévskaya - YouTube
  2. mathtery Sofia Kovalevskaya - YouTube
  3. Sofia Kovalevskaya
  4. Sofía Kovalévskaya
  5. SOFIA KOVALEVSKAYA
  6. Sofia Kovalevskaya Mini-Bio

Sofia Kovalevskaya – Matemática e defensora dos direitos das mulheres. Sofia Kovalevskaya foi uma matemática de renome, bem como escritora e defensora dos direitos das mulheres. A sua luta ... La matemática rusa Sofia Kovalevskaya se convirtió en la primera mujer profesora en Rusia y Europa del Norte. Las matemáticas estaban en la sangre de Sofía.: su padre, su abuelo y su bisabuelo ... Nueve profesoras que imparten docencia en diferentes titulaciones de ingeniería de la Universidad Pública de Navarra (UPNA) son las autoras e intérpretes de ... A mini biography video of the great Russian mathematician Sofia Kovalevskaya. Enjoy the videos and music you love, upload original content, and share it all with friends, family, and the world on YouTube. Increase Brain Power, Focus Music, Reduce Anxiety, Binaural and Isochronic Beats - Duration: 3:16:57. Music for body and spirit - Meditation music Recommended for you